Suzie McAdam Knows Ireland’s Local Design Materials

I’ve always been drawn to monolithic or heavy stone and marble because I think it gives balance to a design.

Brick, granite or marble, Ireland’s Suzie McAdam knows local design materials. She also knows that the start of any of the best interior designs begins with a solid foundation, like stone sourced locally in her native Ireland! In fact, she’s known exactly that since tackling her first interior design project at age 9!

Marble, in Suzie’s option, is “one of those key materials” that can have a luxurious visual impact whilst being durable and practical. ©suziemcadam.com

Marble, in Suzie’s option, is “one of those key materials” that can have a luxurious visual impact whilst being durable and practical. ©suziemcadam.com

“My parents were designing a stone cottage in Northern Ireland, so I began sketching and seeing if I could introduce more light. Even though I was young, I think they saw that there was some logic there and they implemented it.”

Soon enough Suzie parlayed her natural talent into a career designing throughout Ireland, from Georgian era mansions in Dublin’s city centre, to modern builds in the suburbs. Throughout her training in architecture, interior design and her career, however, she’s always held onto her Irish roots and stone-imbued beginnings, and it shows in her work. Suzie’s interiors reflect the natural landscape of Ireland – in all its emerald green and moody grey sky glory – through the use of colour, light and texture in contemporary new ways.

Through the use of colour, light and texture in contemporary ways, Suzie’s interiors reflect the natural landscape of Ireland. ©suziemcadam.com

Through the use of colour, light and texture in contemporary ways, Suzie’s interiors reflect the natural landscape of Ireland. ©suziemcadam.com

“I love to introduce a little bit of glamour and luxury into my designs. I think marble is one of those key materials that can create that kind of impact.”

When designing an Irish kitchen, Suzie encourages her clients to go local. For example, to make worktops that are both durable and beautiful, Suzie looks to local design materials from her own backyard for inspiration, like Calcutta marble from the mountains of Wicklow.

“From an environmental point of view, I try to source local products.”

However, when it comes to making use of trends that are meaningful to her clients in the long run, Suzie also looks further afield for inspiration and her design instincts are always on-the-button. This is largely the result of being an avid traveller and regular visitor of “design cities” like London, Paris, Copenhagen and New York. Having just returned from the 2016 Euro Cucina in Milan, Suzie has identified that matte finishes, metallics and maximalism are hot now, and may be for some time yet.

The trend to move towards maximalism in kitchen design can be seen in the introduction of warmer metals like copper and brass. ©suziemcadam.com

The trend to move towards maximalism in kitchen design can be seen in the introduction of warmer metals like copper and brass. ©suziemcadam.com

“I think there’s definitely a move towards maximalism in kitchen design. I think people are moving away from colder, utilitarian spaces. They want to introduce warmer metals like copper and brass. Also, to have a visual impact, marble is a key trend, because you can create backsplashes and worktops that are luxurious but really practical.”

Though it has been perceived to be slower on the uptake of trends in the past, post-recession Dublin is ready for them. And, Suzie’s happy to provide!