French architect Carole Nau foresees the future of our kitchens

Though the styles and our tastes may have changed, there really are few major differences between today’s kitchens, and the kitchens of our parents. Why? Because there have been very few innovations in the way we use them!

For French interior architect Carole Nau that isn’t at all surprising, because she knows that it’s only the most meaningful innovations that will transform our kitchens; innovations that make our lives easier and more enjoyable. Based in Cannes, the very heart of the glamorous French Riviera, Carole understands that her clients are focussed on living the good life, effortlessly! As such, the one kitchen trend Carole predicts to drive future kitchen design is the exploration of new technologies that make life better.

“People want technology in their kitchen if they don’t want to spend most of their time cooking. In the summer especially, people come here to live outside. They don’t want to spend time in the kitchen. With the right technology you can do this.”

All high-tech kitchens need the Grundig Divide & Cook Oven which spares you the time spent for cooking and lets you enjoy the summer's day. (c) Nau Concept

All high-tech kitchens need the Grundig Divide & Cook Oven which spares you the time spent for cooking and lets you enjoy the summer’s day. (c)grundig.com

It’s a simple formula: the better the technology in the kitchen, the less time you spend there! Intelligent ovens for example, are becoming a frequently requested item in the kitchens Carole designs.

“I hear from different people that they all want this small machine in their kitchen. You get recipes and then you place the food inside, program it, and then you have a meal.”

Though it seems like the future of our imagination is just around the corner (flying cars and all), in the face of all of this technological innovation, there is a growing movement of kitchen customisation in-line with the client’s character. So, Carole works closely with her clients, taking into account their wishes, lifestyle and personality to create kitchen spaces that are absolutely unique.

“You just observe the way the client lives and try to put a little bit of them into the kitchen itself. Then you can have a more personal kitchen with the personality of the family.”

The kitchen is the descriptive art on the personality of the family and Carole assures the vibe of the family is felt in her designs. (c) Nau Concept

The kitchen is the descriptive art on the personality of the family and Carole assures the vibe of the family is felt in her designs. (c) Nau Concept

Though it is tempting to imagine Carole sitting quietly in her studio, imagining her next creative coup (complete with soft music in the background), she understands that kitchens must be as functional as they are beautiful. After all, interior architecture is her second career. She used to be an international business professional. This inherent knowledge that design should be beautiful and practical however, is what drove her to pursue her dream.

“Always I was observing different houses inside and listening to people saying ‘Oh, I could build it like that,’ or, ‘I don’t like this place,’ and so on. There was always some change to do. So, it became very important for me to become a space designer.”

Intrepid enough to quit her job and return to school at 40, what advice does Carole have for new interior designers – particularly those who want to make life more fabulous for their clients?

Aspiring interior designers must not restrain their creativity and be true to themselves. (c) Nau Concept

Aspiring interior designers must not restrain their creativity and be true to themselves.

“If I could give advice to a new interior designer, it would be to not restrain your creativity.”

For Carole, kitchens of the future will need more than new technology. They will need to inspire emotion in the client. They will need interior designers willing to drive creativity in the face of pragmatism.

Find more tips from Carole in her interview with K!TCHN here: