L, U, Galley? Find your perfect kitchen layout below

The layout of a kitchen has a huge impact on functionality, so it’s vital to get it right. One of the best ways to start the design process is to use a number of tried-and-tested template kitchen layouts and adapting it to your space, requirements and budget. Read on for a look at the most popular template kitchen layouts you can use as your base.

Galley Kitchens
One of the simplest, straight-forward kitchen designs is the humble galley kitchen. Popular among younger people and first-time buyers, the galley kitchen can be designed and fitted using standard styles and sizes – making them the most cost-effective solution on the list of layouts.

Although galley kitchens are generally useful in smaller spaces, they also tend to be the most functional to move around. Cooking areas are all in close proximity from each other – preparation, sink and cooking areas tend to be parallel along the same wall, creating an effective ‘production line’ format to the kitchen. This of course means that the other kitchen wall can be used for storage or as a general worktop.

© Leicht

L-Shaped Kitchens
This is the most common kitchen layout, often finished with a tall oven or fridge-freezer combo at the end of the worktop. L-Shaped kitchens provide various storage options, given the various corners units and effective use of space. This kitchen layout is ideal for those with young families, because it provides enough room for a breakfast bar/table – making the room multifunctional.

© Grundig

U-Shaped Kitchens
With a U-Shaped kitchen, you have easy access to the main preparation, washing and cooking areas. While most U-Shaped kitchens don’t allow enough space for a table and chairs, they tend to function well by allowing generous space between the various areas. As a result, this layout is popular amongst older families, families without children, and shared houses.

© larkandlarks

Island Kitchens
Island kitchens are one of the most popular kitchen layouts, providing a practical and functional space when paired with tall units with built-in appliances. When designed with all areas of preparation, washing and hob cooking in front of you, islands are easy to work around, and great to socialise around. The layout also works well in multifunctional living spaces, where they can be a combined living/dining room. Keep in mind that the Island kitchen layout is better suited to larger spaces and would require more budget than simpler layouts.

Double Island Kitchen
In larger open plan spaces, such as converted industrial buildings, a secondary island can be used to divide the area and provide an additional worktop. Usually the main kitchen island would be used for preparation and cooking, while the secondary is reserved for socialising and dishing up.

Given that this layout is only suited to a larger space, it’s often designed as part of a custom project. Finishes are usually chosen by taking the whole house into account, and you can expect to see stainless steel, glass and wood panelling chosen to complete the look of the kitchen.

When planning your kitchen layout, designers often create a finished look first, then work backwards to find a layout that functions well and fits the overall theme. To ensure your kitchen caters to all of your requirements, enlist the help of an expert. While your lifestyle, space and budget often dictate what layout you can use, a professional eye can make all the difference in helping you decide.